Cycle for Survival 2K15

Greetings, everyone!

It’s that time of year again when my team and I ride in Cycle for Survival to raise money to fund lifesaving rare cancer research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Together we can ensure tangible progress and give real hope to patients and their loved ones worldwide.

Why do I ride?

BECAUSE I WANT TO HONOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS TOUCHED BY CANCER. My family and loved ones have been hit hard by different forms of cancer, as have I personally. I will be riding for them and for everyone else affected by all forms of cancer. Cycle for Survival is my way of fighting back and making a difference.

BECAUSE RARE CANCERS ARE MORE COMMON THAN YOU THINK. When you add all of the rare cancers together, approximately 50% of all cancer patients are fighting a rare cancer. And these are familiar diseases: pediatric cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, and thyroid, ovarian and pancreatic cancers are all classified as rare.

BECAUSE THERE AREN’T ENOUGH TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR PATIENTS. There is a critical funding gap in rare cancer research, but we can change that. In the first eight years of events, Cycle for Survival already had raised more than $51 million, arming doctors and researchers with funding to discover new and better treatment options.

What can you do today? Please donate to my ride to support lifesaving research!
Click here to donate

100% of every dollar you give will go directly to pioneering research within six months of the events.

Cycle for Survival has contributed to more than 100 clinical trials and research studies, and also to major research initiatives that will change the way cancer is diagnosed and treated.

Together, we can truly make an impact.

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Thank you for your consideration and continued support.
–Vicky T.

I See the Light

Forgive the corny titles I subject you to on a regular basis; I can’t help myself.

I spent a late night/early morning finishing Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See and upon reading the last page, I felt like this author’s words made a light within me burn brighter. I didn’t sleep a wink as my mind wouldn’t let go of the characters, the imagery, the intricacies of the story that made this book so precious. I found myself highlighting so many passages that I wanted to commit to memory, so thought-provoking and emotive they were as to leave me referring back to them even before I finished reading this book in its entirety. All the Light We Cannot See is a work of art.

“I have been feeling very clearheaded lately and what I want to write about today is the sea. It contains so many colors. Silver at dawn, green at noon, dark blue in the evening. Sometimes it looks almost red. Or it will turn the color of old coins. Right now the shadows of clouds are dragging across it, and patches of sunlight are touching down everywhere. White strings of gulls drag over it like beads.
It is my favorite thing, I think, that I have ever seen. Sometimes I catch myself staring at it and forget my duties. It seems big enough to contain everything anyone could ever feel.”

All-the-Light-We-Cannot-See

Chosen as an Amazon.com book of the month for May 2014, the site’s review is:

Does the world need yet another novel about WWII? It does when the novel is as inventive and beautiful as this one by Anthony Doerr. In fact, All the Light We Cannot See–while set mostly in Germany and France before and during the war–is not really a “war novel.” Yes, there is fear and fighting and disappearance and death, but the author’s focus is on the interior lives of his two characters. Marie Laure is a blind 14-year-old French girl who flees to the countryside when her father disappears from Nazi-occupied Paris. Werner is a gadget-obsessed German orphan whose skills admit him to a brutal branch of Hitler Youth. Never mind that their paths don’t cross until very late in the novel, this is not a book you read for plot (although there is a wonderful, mysterious subplot about a stolen gem). This is a book you read for the beauty of Doerr’s writing– “Abyss in her gut, desert in her throat, Marie-Laure takes one of the cans of food…”–and for the way he understands and cherishes the magical obsessions of childhood. Marie Laure and Werner are never quaint or twee. Instead they are powerful examples of the way average people in trying times must decide daily between morality and survival. –Sara Nelson

The same thought crossed my mind before I made the purchase: do I really want to read another WWII story? However the synopsis and reviews convinced me to go through with it. Thank the literary gods that I did! This has easily become one of my best reads of the year for the way Anthony Doerr’s vision has burned these words, characters and feelings into my brain and heart.

“So how, children, does the brain, which lives without a spark of light, build for us a world full of light?”

Spoken in French over a transistor radio with Claire de Lune playing in the background? Magical.